2017 Winners

EMPOWER, AN INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT APPROACH TO INFORMAL SETTLEMENT UPGRADING

Summary:

The project aims to reshape the approach to informal settlement upgrading by offering an innovative, accessible and inclusive methodology for the fair distribution of public space, a safer urban environment, delivery of basic services, and an urbanization scheme that combines housing upgrades with new economic and social possibilities. Informal settlement residents and local government are the immediate benefits of this approach. The long term goals are to influence a new direction in housing policy and offer much needed diversity and access to housing for the gap market. Socially, the project will have a positive impact on personal safety, gender empowerment through equal opportunities in selection of development committees, consolidation of community cohesion through preferential neighbourhood cluster selection. Informal settlements are plagued by environmental risks, predatory violence, and limited emergency services access. The combination of a fire-resistant, two-story housing prototype and reconfigured urban plan will reduce the threat of natural hazards, create demarcated circulation routes for emergency vehicles, firebreaks, and new elevated sightlines into shared courtyard spaces for routine neighbourhood surveillance. Realigned housing units allow for the retrofitting of basic infrastructure services. Finally, the potential for personal and collective empowerment throughout the act of upgrading is assured through the project’s inclusive and participatory framework. The whole process involves active participation from all community members in spatial, political and economic decision-making, guaranteeing knowledge transfer and the development of local capacity. Digital planning tools for the management and documentation of the upgrade project developed at the ETH support the transparent and fluid workflow of all stakeholders involved including land owners, municipal governments, upgrade facilitators and the community development committee. These tools in the form of an upgrade tablet application, computational analysis and planning software and an online interface support the replicability and scalability of the project.

Kappo - Cyclists Analytics for Smart Cities

Summary:

Kappo is a platform that helps cities to increase the urban bicycle usage worldwide through gamification and safety navigation for citizens, wellness & CSR for companies and giving cyclists insight and predictive analytics for governments, enabling better planning and higher return on urban infrastructure investments. Understanding that every city in the world have 3 main actors -Citizens, Government and Institutions- Kappo has created tools for each one, which aligns and amplifies the efforts that they are already making to encourage the bicycle usage, ensuring that any city that implements the entire platform can transform itself into a bike-friendly city within 5 years. “People need to commute in a daily basis and to do that they need a vehicle, today are more cars because cities are builded for them, but this is changing, every day more people use bicycles instead of cars because all the intrinsic benefits and our cities are responding adapting to it. The timing has arrived: The world will switch from a Car Industry Mobility to a Bicycle Industry Mobility.” - Iván Páez Mora, Founder & CEO - Kappo Bike

THREE PUBLIC SPACES TO ENHANCE COMMUNITY RESILIENCE

Summary:

According to 2014 WHO’s estimations, in Haiti 74,4% of the urban population live in informal settlements. Due to weak planning practices and law enforcement, during the past 30 years, the urban fabric of the metropolitan area of Port-au-Prince developed informally and predominantly configured into private space. Public space results in crowded, dangerous and unhealthy circulation spaces, a problem that exists also in Carrefour-Feuilles, the informal neighbourhood in the Southern outskirts of Port-au-Prince (Haiti), where the proposed project is located. The three newly completed public spaces built by Emergent Vernacular Architecture (EVA Studio) in the framework of the LAMIKA Program, are intended to respond to the scarcity of communal urban space in Carrefour-Feuilles, a neighbourhood which suffered extensive damage in the 2010 earthquake. A year after the construction works completion, the three public spaces, “Place Tapis Rouge”, “Place Kay Alfred” and “Terrain Campeche”, are for residents places of exchange and cultural engagement. The upgrade and the creation of the public spaces functioned as a way to organise the privatised fabric of the informal settlement and to compensate for the lack of adequate indoor housing space. Co-designed by EVA Studio and community members, the three public spaces enhance the participation of different population groups to urban life. As the “public space is the place where legality takes place” (Saskia Sassen, 2016), upgrading and consolidating public spaces in Carrefour-Feuilles, a neighbourhood where the presence and the capacity to intervene of local authorities is weak, is a way to connect the neighbourhood with the rest of the city and enforce human rights and laws. The project shows how public space can enhance community resilience by improving quality of life, providing access to services, ameliorating social cohesion around the care of a common good.

Using Safetipin to Build Safer and Inclusive Public spaces

Summary:

Safetipin is a mobile app and technology platform that collects and disseminates information and data about safety issues in a city. Data is generated through our two apps - My Safetipin which is a platform for citizen engagement and user generated data. The second app Safetipin Nite collects pictures of the city through a vehicle. We use the tool of the safety audit which identifies specific parameters that make a city feel unsafe for women and girls in particular. The safety audit has eight parameters which contribute to the feeling of unsafety and exclusion. These include infrastructure aspects (lighting, walk path, openness, public transport) as well as social usage of public spaces (presence of people and women in particular, security and 'eyes on the street'.) Safetipin provides the platform for people to share and contribute data. Based on the data collected, we provide analysis and recommendations to city governments and other urban stakeholders to help improve public spaces. We have over 70,000 downloads of the app till date and have some data collected in 30 cities in India and globally. We have partnership for the app and data to be used by city administrations in 5 cities. The data ha two purposes. One is help individual app users make safer decisions about mobility and public space; and the second is to help city governments with large scale data that helps them make public spaces safer and more inclusive for all. As spaces improve, data is once again collected to measure change and impact. Cities have used Safetipin to improve lighting, last mile connectivity, better design, safe bicycle tracks,safe public parks, and markets. Our aim is to create safer public spaces for residents to use and cities where diversity of people are given the opportunity to move without fear.

Clean City by Green Economy

Summary:

Coastal cities are the gate keepers of the Ocean. A dirty city makes a dirty ocean, and a dirty ocean makes a dirty city. Over 80% of ocean based waste is plastic from inland or from the ocean. Capturing in a systematic and sustainable way is critical. Sam Ngaruiya and his company, Regeneration Environmental Services provide to the cities a community base collection system, logistics of collection and most importantly manufacturing of quality Eco-Construction products. City and beach waste plastic is mixed with sand and other ingredients to make long lasting, quality side-walk pavers, bollards, road signage and fencing posts. Sam and his company provide an economic demand for waste plastic which than cleans the environment, creates jobs and by paving the streets and side walk makes for a more beautiful and easy to clean coastal city.

Courtyard System for Management of Public Spaces

Summary:

Our submission for the award under this category is premised on the success we have had through community action in initiating transformation of a populous local neighborhood in Nairobi (Dandora) and improve: the street life, personal safety, economic opportunities for the youth, better waste management, mitigation of urban decay and creation plus maintenance of new public spaces. Our intervention and practice entails an informal disaggregation of the neighborhood into cells known as courtyards. The youth and the residents living in those courtyards establish a youth group that is then given the responsibility for the regeneration and maintenance of the space within the courtyard and the adjacent public street. The residents then agree to pay a monthly fee to the appointed youth for the regeneration and maintenance. This creates sustainable jobs for the young people, provides the residents with a clean, safe and well-maintained courtyard and public street while creating a sense of ownership and civic duty for all the residents. This practice has in the last three years grown from five to over 120 courtyards across Dandora. Additionally, in order to stir the growth and entrenchment of this practice, DTL the CBO runs an annual competition, currently in its 3rd year where the youth groups compete to see which group’s intervention has had the highest impact in fostering safety, cleanliness and community cohesion. In between the annual competition, there is a quarterly courtyard grading applied to participating teams to ensure that the interventions are maintained throughout the year. After the success of this practice in Dandora, a number of groups interested in urban regeneration have now formed a network to scale up the intervention across Nairobi.

We are Medina Learning from Jnane Aztout

Summary:

Learning from Jnane Aztout is a cooperative project of the University of Seville with the Moroccan public program Plan Villes Sans Bidonvilles Towns without slu ms in Larache Morocco The main contribution of the experience to the program is its participatory and multi agent coordination methodology The population has ta ken part in the decision making through workshops meetings and participation in the Monitoring of the Plan Committee According to external evaluation the local leadership through its Widadiyat with the technical support of the interdiscipli nary team provides the key to its success Nosotros Tambien Somos Medina We are a lso Medina was the mobilising motto of the process an expression which describes the transformation objectives of the URBS the CIVITAS and the POLIS To make thi s possible starting from a situation where residents felt under threat of expuls ion we launched the construction of the triangle of the Social Management of the Habitat based on the establishment of a bond of technical neighbourly trust and of the participatory development of a diagnosis of the initial situation and of the intervention strategy that would be proposed to the authorities responsible for the program Along with the transforming action of physical social economic environmental and political reality the project has simultaneously developed act ivities of educational innovation by involving undergraduate and graduate studen ts from various universities and by producing scientific publications Ya Somos M edina We are Medina states that the objectives have been fulfilled the URBS is a lready as pretty as the medina once public space has been urbanized and the shan ties replaced with houses as projected case by case with the families involved W e have managed to eradicate the slums from the mind and to make the neighbours f eel included in the CIVITAS and it has been possible to build the POLIS whereby rights of neighbours to transform their neighbourhood are recognized

Monitoring urban prosperity and sustainability in 153 municipalities in Mexico

Summary:

Infonavit, the largest social mortgage company in Latin America, has implemented a national strategy to measure the prosperity and sustainability of Mexican Municipalities. The first stage has covered 153 municipalities in the 32 states of the country (recently starting a second stage with 152 additional municipalities), encompassing more than half of the total population of the country and placing this effort as the most comprehensive of its kind in the world. Using the City Prosperity Index (CPI) developed by UN-Habitat, Infonavit has created a national platform to diagnose the state of cities in six critical dimensions of prosperity and sustainability: Productivity, Urban Infrastructure Development, Quality of Life, Equity and Social Inclusion, Environmental Sustainability and Governance and Legislation. Based on this diagnosis, Infonavit and the Government of Mexico are implementing specific action plans in each municipality to improve the quality of life of its inhabitants and Infonavit right-holders. The initiative has already been presented and delivered to decision makers in all the diagnosed localities and has been made public online to all who wish to consult it. This makes Mexico the first country in the world that has developed this metric at this scale, as support for decision-making in this matter. The results for the 153 studies, which include the municipalities with the highest urban growth, have been validated by the evaluated entities, and extend to the 16 Political Delegations of Mexico City with the purpose of analyzing the intra-urban dynamics in the largest urban agglomeration of the country. Various other cities are adapting and further developing this methodology for the monitoring and evaluation of their own policies. This represents a clear transferability of the process that has also been extended to other cities and countries in the world. The conclusions and recommendations emanating from these studies are fully in line with the guidelines of the New Urban Agenda and respond to several of the thematic axes of the Sustainable Development Objectives (SDG) in cities.

Making land-use climate-sensitive: A project to increase resilience of cities against floods by integrating climate change into land-use planning

Summary:

In recent years, many serious weather related disasters such as floods and landslides occurred in Southeast Asia. One of the main causes of this is large-scale land transformation accompanying industrialization and urbanization, and there is concern that due to climate change, the problem will become even severer. Comprehensive land use management considering climate change is thought to be useful for prevention and reduction of weather disasters. Targeting the Silang-Sta. Rosa watershed on the coast of Laguna Lake, the largest lake in the Philippines, this project aimed to develop and apply the "Participatory Watershed Land-use Management (PWLM)" approach, which consists of the following four steps: (1) scenario analysis, (2) risk assessment, (3) countermeasure development, and (4) land-use plan improvement. The PWLM application found that about 90% of the land in the watershed will be converted for residential, commercial, and industrial use. When assuming a typhoon once every ten years, about 1180 hectares of land will be flooded, affecting approximately 230,000 residents. Based on these findings, countermeasures were formulated in each local government, and furthermore, the existing land-use plans were revised, and the local climate change action plans were formulated. It is expected that the area and population affected by floods will decrease by 20% by preserving existing vegetation and introducing runoff neutral development. The damage will be further reduced by strengthening development controls and building standards in high-risk areas. Currently, the project is being replicated in additional two watersheds in the Lake Laguna basin. It is hoped that in cooperation with the national government of the Philippines, the project is scaled up to the entire lake basin that consists of 24 watersheds.

Reforming Urban Laws in Africa: a practical guide

Summary:

The African Centre for Cities (ACC), at the University of Cape Town, identified the need to develop a platform for urban planning law reform in the region in 2009. The reason for this initiative was to focus on the practical question of how to achieve effective and appropriate urban legislation. With the support of the Rockefeller Foundation the ACC worked closely with the Association of African Planning Schools, to develop case materials on urban planning law reform as well as a model curriculum for teaching planning law in an African university. This was taken further, with the idea of Reforming Urban Laws in Africa: a practical guide (referred to from here as ‘the Guide’). The Guide was conceived as a means to provide practical advice to officials and consultants working on urban legal reform on how to manage that process in a way that can produce effective results. It draws on the co-authors’ practical experience and many years of insights into urban legal reform in the region. The Guide is university-driven research that was designed and supported to address a wicked problem facing African cities: the laws used to manage, plan and govern these cities are out of date and ineffective, yet very difficult to replace or improve. These laws are invariably inappropriate to the context of a rapidly urbanizing continent, where the patterns of urbanization are quite different from those experienced in other regions. Yet, these laws remain stubbornly in place. Efforts to improve them inevitably fail. Technical legal solutions to urban problems are pursued when there is very little understanding - among donors as much as government officials - of how to draft laws that can actually work in an African urban context. The Guide combines practical experience with academic research to address urban legal reform in Africa.